Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group: Managing Extractive Industries to Protect Biodiversity in DRC: Report of a workshop held June 13-14, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

 

docs/news/Juin-Aout-2013/DRC-Mining.jpgOn June 13-14, the ABCG "Mining and Biodiversity in DRC" working group (including Wildlife Conservation SocietyConservation InternationalWorld Wildlife Fund and World Resources Institute) held a strategic and technical workshop in DR Congo's capital Kinshasa. The workshop's overall objective was to promote best practices in DRC's mining sector by identifying opportunities to increase their implementation so as to mitigate impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem service values from mining sector development.

 

Held under the high patronage of the Ministry of Mines, this workshop brought together participants from government, mining enterprises, donors, civil society, and conservation organizations. Key recommendations include improved land use planning, requirements for collaboration among stakeholders and improved law and policy that strengthens biodiversity conservation.

 

docs/news/Juin-Aout-2013/DRC-Mining-3.jpgThe workshop featured 18 technical presentations, followed by facilitated discussion to formulate specific recommendations. Opening remarks were given by the Secretary General, Ministry of Mines, by the Secretary General, Ministry of Environment and by USAID-DRC Mission Director Diana Putman. The main themes of this workshop were technical in nature, regarding:

 

♦ Legal context for DRC's mining sector environmental obligations

♦ Mitigation hierarchy and international best practices for the mining sector

♦ Environmental Impact Assessments and Strategic Environmental Evaluation

♦ Integrated land-use planning

♦ Evaluation of artisanal mining impacts and tools for mitigation 

♦ Case studies from DRC demonstrating implementation of the mitigation hierarchy

 

Closing remarks from Kasanda NGOY, Secretary General of the Ministry of Mines, noted the Ministry of Mines' view of the importance of environmental best practices for the mining sector:

 

"The mining sector has been the main driver of DR Congo's economic development for the last century and continues to be, but tomorrow and forever our children will require clean water, forests, and wildlife to undergird their pursuit of development. We at the Ministry of Mines remain engaged to work in consultation with the Ministry of Environment to afford conservation of biodiversity its warranted priority".

 

"This workshop's principal recommendation is the implementation of best practices in order to reduce negative impacts caused by mining activities. I assure the organizers of this workshop that my ministry will redouble its efforts to respect international best practices in order to better orient the DRC towards sustainable development".

 

 

(l-r) Hon François NZEKUYE - Deputy Nat'l ;  Mr Kasanda NGOY, Secretary General, Ministry of Mines; Mr Benoit KISUKI, Conservation International

 

docs/news/Juin-Aout-2013/DRC-Mining.jpegParticipants included four Members of Parliament, relevant technical experts from the Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation & Tourism (Directorate of Forest Inventories and Management

Institute for Nature Conservation, Department of Evaluation and Planning and Department of Sustainable Development) as well as the Ministry of Mines (Mining Cadastre, Mining Directorate of Environmental Protection, Technical Unit for Coordination and Planning and Service for Assistance and Organization of Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining). US Government officials participating in the workshop included USAID-DRC Mission Director Diana Putnam, Jean-Solo Ratsisompatrarivo, US Forest Service Technical Coordinator to Directorate of Forest Inventories and Management (Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Tourism), and Ken Creighton, USAID-CARPE Senior Global Climate Change Specialist/Regional Advisor. Richard Robinson, USAID-DRC Extractive Industries Technical Advisor, provided important guidance to the workshop themes and participant list.

 

The workshop's final recommendations are as follows:

 

Artisanal & Small Scale Mining:

 

♦ SAESSCAM, the Mining Ministry's Service for Assistance and Organization of Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining, should oblige these actors to affiliate within cooperatives, and reinforce their organizational capacity to respect environmental obligations for improved biodiversity conservation.

 

Land Use Planning:

♦ The Congolese government should evaluate the potential mineral resources and biodiversity on national territory which is not yet attributed for particular land use in order for these areas to be designated for artisanal mining, industrial mining and "no-go zones" (potential conservation areas) in order to avoid overlap.

♦ The Congolese government should put the Environment sector as the same level of priority as the Mining sector by adopting the objective of "Net zero loss of biodiversity". In order to mitigate impacts from mining activities on critical conservation areas to a net zero loss result, all mining sector actors should be obliged to follow strictly defined mitigation hierarchy measures (avoid, minimize, rehabilitate, and compensate).

 

Law and Policy:

♦ Legal regulations regarding mineral exploitation should be reviewed in favor of biodiversity conservation, with harmonization of concepts and required expertise, adapted and translated into national languages.

♦ The Congolese government should respect the integrity of legal protected areas by cancelling all mining concessions ceded within them and also develop a strategy to negotiate evacuation of artisanal miners from these sites.

 

Capacity Building:

♦ The Ministry of Mines in consultation with the Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Tourism should reinforce the capacity of actors (mine inspectors, civil society, public and private mining enterprises) implicated in the independent monitoring and evaluation of environmental obligations for the mining sector.

 

Collaboration:

♦ The Congolese government should create a legal consultation framework between the Ministries of Mines and Environment and their relevant services in order to resolve existing issues (and to avoid new problems) related to the attribution of overlapping concessions and protected areas.

♦ The Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Tourism should elaborate a strategy for intervention and synergy with the Ministry of Mines, specifically with the Mining Directorate of Environmental Protection in order to more efficiently manage ecosystems threatened by mining activities.

♦ Public and private mining enterprises, artisanal miners, as well as the public administration must implicate local and resident communities in all steps in the elaboration of community development actions, adhering to free, prior and informed consent (FPIC) standards.

 

 

For more information on this and other efforts related to Mining and Biodiversity in the Congo Basin, please visit www.abcg.org.

 

This project was made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) under the terms of Cooperative Agreement No. RLA-A-00-07-00043-00. The contents are the responsibility of the Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group (ABCG) and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States Government.

 

For more Information concerning the Content of this Article, please consult:

The Official Website of the Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group

 

 

Go back

CBFP News

Linking local people's perception of wildlife and conservation to livelihood and poaching alleviation: A case study of the Dja biosphere reserve, Cameroon

This Paper examines how people's livelihoods and perceptions of wildlife are related to self-reported poaching(here defined as commercial bushmeat hunting) in 25 villages at the northern buffer zone of the Dja Biosphere Reserve, East Cameroon. Using a six-point Likert scale questionnaire among 263 households interviewed form March to June 2017, the following hypothesis were tested: (1) Households with positive perceptions of wildlife are less involved in poaching; (2) Positive perceptions of wildlife are linked to sustainable livelihood improvement of households; and (3) Sustainable livelihood improvement of households leads to poaching alleviation.

Read more …

Forest Watch May 2019: Will global deforestation finally be on the agenda at the EU elections?

To read: Global deforestation becoming one of the top issues in the European elections ; Commission presidency candidate says he would tackle human rights abuses in EU imports; Huge illegal forest trade deal in Democratic Republic of Congo: urgent EU action is required; Funders must rethink the false agro-industrial park solution...

Read more …

China in Cameroon’s forests: A review of issues and progress for livelihoods and sustainability

This report introduces the nature and scale of the issues involved, and how the China- Africa Forest Governance Project has engaged with them. It analyses the impact of Chinese-linked investments and companies on forests and livelihoods in the forest and non-forest sectors – agro-industries, mining and infrastructure. The report describes the efforts made through the project to improve policy and practice in China-Cameroon forest issues and outlines some ways forward.

Read more …

China to host World Environment Day 2019 on air pollution

Approximately 7 million people worldwide die prematurely each year from air pollution, with about 4 million of these deaths occurring in Asia-Pacific. World Environment Day 2019 will urge governments, industry, communities, and individuals to come together to explore renewable energy and green technologies, and improve air quality in cities and regions across the world.

Read more …

iucncongress2020-Host a session during the Forum

Organisations and individuals can propose hosting a session during the Forum of the IUCN World Conservation Congress. Hosting a session is an excellent opportunity to inform debate and drive conservation action on the issues that matter most to you or your organisation. The call for proposals will be open from 6 May to 17 July 2019.

Read more …

EU Communication (2019) on Stepping up EU Action against Deforestation and Forest Degradation

On 14 December, the European Commission published a Roadmap on the EU initiative on Stepping up EU Action against Deforestation and Forest Degradation. The Roadmap sets out the context and objectives of the initiative and the foreseen consultation, and was open for feedback until 15 January 2019 via this page....

Read more …

Summary of the Public Consultation Stepping up EU Action against Deforestation and Forest Degradation

The public  consultation  was  open  from 14 January  2019until 25 February  2019.  It  received  955 responses,  including  97  attachments.This summary  report presents the headline  results  from  the public consultation, under each section of the survey questionnaire.

Read more …

IISD- 2019 Meetings of the Conferences of the Parties to the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions

Work continued apace on Thursday at the 2019 meetings of the Conferences of the Parties (COPs) to the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm (BRS) Conventions. On the penultimate day of the meetings, delegates convened in plenary in the morning to look into issues of joint concern, as well as work related to the Rotterdam Convention (RC).

Read more …

CBFP News Archive

2019

Forest Watch April 2019
Forest Watch March 2019