COMIFAC - GTBAC 11: SGT-PFNL (Non Timber Forest Product Sub-Group) established in Douala

SGT-PFNL (Non Timber Forest Product Sub-Group) is established, the 2011 roadmap is adopted and 14 recommendations and resolutions are formulated on the implementation of the decisions of the tenth Conference of Parties (COP10) on the Convention on biological diversity (APA Protocol, strategic plan (2011-2020), etc.), the APA sub-regional strategy of COMIFAC countries and the functioning of national PFNL consultative committees. These are the major outcomes of the eleventh GTBAC meeting.

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From 1 to 4 March 2011 was held in Douala, Cameroon, the eleventh GTBAC meeting on the implementation of the decisions of the tenth Conference of Parties (COP10) on the Convention on biological diversity and the fifth meeting of parties to the Cartagena protocol on the prevention of Biotechnological risks (MOP5) and the putting in place of the Non Timber Forest product sub-working group. The meeting was attended by more than 20 participants, mostly Biodiversity National Focal Points from COMIFAC countries, members of COMIFAC Executive Secretariat, CEEAC representative, representatives of international organizations and the civil society (UICN, FAO, ICRAF, REFADD), GIZ project representatives, representatives of the capacity building Initiative for APA Africa and of CBFP. The workshop was organized by COMIFAC Executive Secretariat, with the financial support of GIZ project, the capacity building Initiative in terms of access to Biological / genetic resources and for the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits of their use for Africa and of the FAO.

 

Two specific objectives of the workshop was (1) to discuss the modalities of the implementation of the strategy of COMIFAC countries with regard to the APA adopted by the Council of Ministers in November 2010, and (2) to examine and validate the TOR for the putting in place of PFNL sub-working-group within GTBAC.

 

For five consecutive days with many communications in plenary, participants listened to exposés structured around eight aspects, including: (1) Evaluating the implementation of GTBAC 10 resolutions and recommendations; (2) CdP10 Report; (3) RdP5 Report; (4) Report of the Pan African workshop on APA; (5) the importance of PFNL in poverty eradication and for food security in Central Africa; (6) PFNL/GTBAC sub-working group TOR; (7) The implementation of APA sub-regional strategy for COMIFAC countries; (8) Various communications, including those relating to the presentation of Cameroon APA project and the 2011 International Biodiversity Day.

 

At the end of plenary discussions, participants adopted a final communiqué, a roadmap, established a PFNL Sub-Group within GTBAC and formulated recommendations and resolutions, structured around 14 main points. In general terms, constructive discussions and concrete results of this eleventh meeting confirmed the important role GTBAC intends to play to guarantee the implementation of Nagoya recommendations in Central Africa.

 

To better understand the stakes of this meeting, please download:


The Final Communiqué

 

2011-03-08 GTBAC Roadmap

 

PFLN Sub-Working Group TOR

 

WELCOME ADDRESS OF THE REPRESENTATIVE OF COMIFAC EXECUTIVE SECRETARY

 

Speech of Dr Honoré TABUN, CEEAC Representative

 

Summary report of the 5th meeting of the Conference of Parties to the Convention on biological diversity holding as the meeting of parties to Cartagena Protocol on the prevention of biotechnological risks (COP-MOP5)

 

Importance of non timber forest products for poverty eradication and food security in Central Africa - By Ousseynou NDOYE (FAO), MARTIN TADOUM (COMIFAC), ARMAND ASSENG ZE (FAO), JULIANE MASUCH (FAO) AND JULIUS TIEGUHONG CHUPEZI (FAO)

 

To learn more, please contact M. NCHOUTPOUEN CHOUAIBOU [cnchoutpouen@yahoo.fr]

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