Daily Nation: Leave forests standing to get much greater value from them

 

 

It is not always obvious, but forests offer greater value when they are kept intact instead of being chopped down for timber or converted to pastures, highways or mining pits.

 

The problem is that while timber has a clear price tag, the services that forests provide do not.

 

So what do forests give us and what is it worth? Consider the following services that forests provide and think about how much value you would attach to each.

 

The forest ecosystem helps to retain water and prevent soil erosion. Farmers struggle without forests, even if they are miles away.

 

By helping regulate rainfall and maintaining soil quality, forests give us productive agricultural lands.

 

They are also home to the birds that eat pests and the bees and other insects that pollinate our food crops.

 

And once the temperature and water regulating functions of forests are compromised, farmers are more likely to be exposed to droughts, floods, fires, and infertile soils.

 

The forest ecosystem gives us energy. In Kenya, hydroelectricity accounts for about 70 per cent of power generation.

 

Hydroelectric dams would not be able to function without the country’s vital water towers, the highland forested areas from where water flows to all but one of Kenya’s main rivers.

 

But these water towers need forests to provide these services.

 

Beyond regulating water, the forest ecosystem retains sediment that would otherwise flow into the hydroelectric plants and jam the systems. And then we have climate change. Forests are vital buffers against tragedy.

 

 

WATER TOWERS

We are already seeing the dramatic and devastating impact of severe drought in the north of Kenya, and we know this will only occur more regularly as the climate changes further.

 

 

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CBFP News

UE Forest Watch: October 2017

Scientists raise the alarm over recent EU climate policy proposals… ICAO biofuel plans are a Trojan horse for palm oil.. Commission comments on palm oil offer hope: Now EU should deliver on deforestation…

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conservationandsociety: Not Seeing the Cattle for the Elephants: The Implications of Discursive Linkages between Boko Haram and Wildlife Poaching in Waza National Park, Cameroon

The decline of wildlife in Central and West African border parks has been directly linked to Islamic terrorism in the region in media and government discourse. Using Waza National Park in the Far North Region of Cameroon as a case study, we show that wildlife declines in the park long preceded the appearance of Boko Haram, the extremist group best known for kidnapping over 200 girls in northern Nigeria. We also show that there is no evidence that Boko Haram are using wildlife products from the park to sustain their operations.

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Theconversation: Why blaming ivory poaching on Boko Haram isn’t helpful

In 2016, as part of a ceremony in Cameroon’s capital Yaoundé, 2 000 elephant tusks were burned to demonstrate the country’s commitment to fight poaching and illegal trade in wildlife. US Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power gave a speech at the event linking poaching to terrorism.

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Environmental Policy and Governance: An Assessment Framework for Benefit Sharing Mechanisms to Reduce Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation within a Forest Policy Mix

Policy instruments for implementing the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation and the enhancement of forest carbon stocks (REDD+) mechanism operate within an orchestra of policy mixes that affect the forest and other land sectors. How will policymakers choose between the myriad of options for distributing REDD+ benefits, and be able to evaluate its potential effectiveness, efficiency and equity (3Es)? This is a pressing issue given the results-based aspect of REDD+.

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thegef: Listening to our Land: Stories of Resilience

“…With the knowledge we are gaining, we will become better land and natural resource managers, because we’re understanding how we need to treat our land, and the plants and animals on it.”

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IITA: Stakeholders strategize ways to prevent MLN in West Africa

7 October 2017. Stakeholders came together in a workshop to discuss and prioritize action plans for preventive control of the Maize Lethal Necrosis (MLN) in maize production, on 26 September at IITA, Ibadan.

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IITA: New app diagnoses crop diseases in the field and alerts rural farmers

29 September 2017 The team behind a new mobile app that uses artificial intelligence to accurately diagnose crop diseases in the field has won a $US100,000 award to help expand their project to help millions of small-scale farmers across Africa.

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thegef: New commitments made at 2017 Our Ocean conference

The 2017 conference, which was hosted by the European Union, and took place in Malta on October 5th and 6th, saw a renewed global commitment to six areas – marine protected areas, sustainable fisheries, marine pollution, maritime security, sustainable blue economy, and climate change.  The theme of the conference – “An Ocean for Life” – serves as a reminder that while more than 3 billion people directly depend on the seas for their livelihoods, their continued vitality indirectly impacts everyone.

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CBFP News Archive

2017

SEP2D web site launch
GCF: Mainstreaming gender
REFADD prepares for COP 23
CBFP Flash News July 2017
unep: Annual Report 2016
MEFDDE Newsletter, May 2017
greenclimate.fund : Careers
IUCN: Annual report 2016
Infosylva 09/2017
Sixth SGTAPFS meeting
EU Forest Watch April 2017
What is World Water Day?
GCF- Get accredited
IAF and the 2030 Agenda