An extreme emergency anti-poaching plan (PEXULAB) to protect elephants in ECCAS countries adopted in Yaounde

 

The year 2012 was marked by the slaughter of elephants in the northern part of Cameroon, according to official sources, 300 elephant carcasses were found without trunks in the Cameroonian National Park of Bouba N’Djida. This horrific scene continued into the night of 14 to 15 March 2013 when close to 89 elephants in Chad and later roughly 30 elephants in Central African Republic were killed. In the face of this ecological scandal, accusing fingers point to « poachers » from Sudan, usually heavily armed and travelling on camel and horseback. This is the main reason that led the ECCAS ministers of foreign affairs, defense and security issues, regional integration and wildlife protection to break the silence by convening an extreme emergency meeting in Yaounde (Cameroon) on 23 March 2013 to adopt an Extreme Emergency Anti-Poaching Plan (PEXULAB) in the northern region of Cameroon, Chad and the northern and north-western regions of the Central African Republic and in the forest zone.

 

This important gathering was preceded from 21 to 23 March 2013, by a preparatory segment which attracted a large number of experts on issues of foreign affairs, defense and security, wildlife and sub regional integration. They were assisted by an assortment of diplomatic representations (Libya, Chad, USA, EU), United Nations agencies (Unesco, FAO, PNUD/GEF, UNOPS), Cooperation agencies (UE, AFD, GIZ, USAID, USFS), national and international organizations and institutions (CEEAC, COMIFAC, RAPAC, OCFSA, TRAFFIC, CEFDHAC, UICN, WWF, SOS Eléphants, WCS, BAD, REPAR, ECOFAC V, PACEBCO, ICCN, FTNS, NEPAD, LAGA), national and international journalists from Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, RFI and Imagasine. 

Over (03) days of intense brainstorming, this high profile gathering on the fight against elephant poaching in the savanna area of ECCAS, arrived at the adoption of a PEXULAB with the overall aim of launching an emergency fight against elephant poaching in the savannah zone and the forest zone in Central Africa. Attaining this objective would be premised on an offensive and defensive approach to neutralize poachers and secure the zones concerned.

 

For better operationalisation of PEXULAB, participants divided the ECCAS zone into two (02) intervention zones:

 

♦ Zone A: North Cameroon, Northern and South-Western CAR and the South of Chad,

 

♦ Zone B: the other zones of Central Africa.

 

With four strategic axes of intervention:

 

♦ Information and security,

♦ Political and diplomatic,

♦ Legal,

♦ Communication and awareness raising.

 

Moreover, given the urgency and the need for intervention, participants urged NGOs to provide logistic, technical and financial support, collect and disseminate data and information on the fight against poaching (LAB), and help in awareness raising and other activities in close conjunction with the LAB.

 

 The meeting of Ministers of ECCAS member countries present culminated with a statement mainly calling on Ivory consuming countries on the one hand to take drastic measures to deter consumers and on the other hand, urging the poachers’ countries of origin to support affected countries in combating poaching. In addition, the ECCAS countries extended an invitation to the President of the Republic of Cameroon, His Excellency Paul Biya, to agree to be the highest authority in the sub-region, the spokesperson of the anti-poaching fight in Central Africa. In addition, ECCAS countries will mobilize up to 1,000 soldiers to initiate joint military operations to save the last surviving savannah elephants. The emergency plan with an estimated cost of 1.8 million Euros, will require air support, field vehicles, satellite phones, the establishment of a joint military command with a system of sharing and real-time analysis of information, and envisages sending a diplomatic mission to Sudan and South Sudan - the poachers’ country of origin.

 

 It is with words of gratitude to the Cameroon Government for the warm welcome, the facilities made available to them for the smooth conduct of this meeting that various delegations parted with the hope of finally seeing the elephants of the ECCAS zone safe in the coming days.

 

Kindly download

 

 

(1) Declaration on the fight against poaching (LAB)

 

(2) Experts’ Segment Report

 

(3) WWF Press release: Central Africa will mobilise up to 1000 soldiers to save these elephants - Please contact M. Bas HUIJBREGTS, WWF Central Africa - bhuijbregts@wwfcarpo.org

 

 (4) Declaration on the fight against poaching pronounced by IUCN-MIKE at the end of the ECCAS meeting– Please contact: Ms. WANDJA Chantal « Chantal.Wandja@iucn.org » Back

 

Go back

CBFP News

Program 17th Meeting of Partners (MOP)

Please download the: Official Program, 17th Meeting of Parties of the Congo Basin Forest Partnership, 24 to 27 October 2017, Douala, Cameroon, Sawa Hotel...

Read more …

MoP17 - Registration of participants

Registration of participants – from 15.00 (3pm), Sunday 22nd October 2017 (open until 21.00).

Read more …

UE Forest Watch: October 2017

Scientists raise the alarm over recent EU climate policy proposals… ICAO biofuel plans are a Trojan horse for palm oil.. Commission comments on palm oil offer hope: Now EU should deliver on deforestation…

Read more …

conservationandsociety: Not Seeing the Cattle for the Elephants: The Implications of Discursive Linkages between Boko Haram and Wildlife Poaching in Waza National Park, Cameroon

The decline of wildlife in Central and West African border parks has been directly linked to Islamic terrorism in the region in media and government discourse. Using Waza National Park in the Far North Region of Cameroon as a case study, we show that wildlife declines in the park long preceded the appearance of Boko Haram, the extremist group best known for kidnapping over 200 girls in northern Nigeria. We also show that there is no evidence that Boko Haram are using wildlife products from the park to sustain their operations.

Read more …

Theconversation: Why blaming ivory poaching on Boko Haram isn’t helpful

In 2016, as part of a ceremony in Cameroon’s capital Yaoundé, 2 000 elephant tusks were burned to demonstrate the country’s commitment to fight poaching and illegal trade in wildlife. US Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power gave a speech at the event linking poaching to terrorism.

Read more …

Environmental Policy and Governance: An Assessment Framework for Benefit Sharing Mechanisms to Reduce Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation within a Forest Policy Mix

Policy instruments for implementing the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation and the enhancement of forest carbon stocks (REDD+) mechanism operate within an orchestra of policy mixes that affect the forest and other land sectors. How will policymakers choose between the myriad of options for distributing REDD+ benefits, and be able to evaluate its potential effectiveness, efficiency and equity (3Es)? This is a pressing issue given the results-based aspect of REDD+.

Read more …

thegef: Listening to our Land: Stories of Resilience

“…With the knowledge we are gaining, we will become better land and natural resource managers, because we’re understanding how we need to treat our land, and the plants and animals on it.”

Read more …

IITA: Stakeholders strategize ways to prevent MLN in West Africa

7 October 2017. Stakeholders came together in a workshop to discuss and prioritize action plans for preventive control of the Maize Lethal Necrosis (MLN) in maize production, on 26 September at IITA, Ibadan.

Read more …

CBFP News Archive

2017

SEP2D web site launch
GCF: Mainstreaming gender
REFADD prepares for COP 23
CBFP Flash News July 2017
unep: Annual Report 2016
MEFDDE Newsletter, May 2017
greenclimate.fund : Careers
IUCN: Annual report 2016
Infosylva 09/2017
Sixth SGTAPFS meeting
EU Forest Watch April 2017
What is World Water Day?
GCF- Get accredited
IAF and the 2030 Agenda