An extreme emergency anti-poaching plan (PEXULAB) to protect elephants in ECCAS countries adopted in Yaounde

 

The year 2012 was marked by the slaughter of elephants in the northern part of Cameroon, according to official sources, 300 elephant carcasses were found without trunks in the Cameroonian National Park of Bouba N’Djida. This horrific scene continued into the night of 14 to 15 March 2013 when close to 89 elephants in Chad and later roughly 30 elephants in Central African Republic were killed. In the face of this ecological scandal, accusing fingers point to « poachers » from Sudan, usually heavily armed and travelling on camel and horseback. This is the main reason that led the ECCAS ministers of foreign affairs, defense and security issues, regional integration and wildlife protection to break the silence by convening an extreme emergency meeting in Yaounde (Cameroon) on 23 March 2013 to adopt an Extreme Emergency Anti-Poaching Plan (PEXULAB) in the northern region of Cameroon, Chad and the northern and north-western regions of the Central African Republic and in the forest zone.

 

This important gathering was preceded from 21 to 23 March 2013, by a preparatory segment which attracted a large number of experts on issues of foreign affairs, defense and security, wildlife and sub regional integration. They were assisted by an assortment of diplomatic representations (Libya, Chad, USA, EU), United Nations agencies (Unesco, FAO, PNUD/GEF, UNOPS), Cooperation agencies (UE, AFD, GIZ, USAID, USFS), national and international organizations and institutions (CEEAC, COMIFAC, RAPAC, OCFSA, TRAFFIC, CEFDHAC, UICN, WWF, SOS Eléphants, WCS, BAD, REPAR, ECOFAC V, PACEBCO, ICCN, FTNS, NEPAD, LAGA), national and international journalists from Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, RFI and Imagasine. 

Over (03) days of intense brainstorming, this high profile gathering on the fight against elephant poaching in the savanna area of ECCAS, arrived at the adoption of a PEXULAB with the overall aim of launching an emergency fight against elephant poaching in the savannah zone and the forest zone in Central Africa. Attaining this objective would be premised on an offensive and defensive approach to neutralize poachers and secure the zones concerned.

 

For better operationalisation of PEXULAB, participants divided the ECCAS zone into two (02) intervention zones:

 

♦ Zone A: North Cameroon, Northern and South-Western CAR and the South of Chad,

 

♦ Zone B: the other zones of Central Africa.

 

With four strategic axes of intervention:

 

♦ Information and security,

♦ Political and diplomatic,

♦ Legal,

♦ Communication and awareness raising.

 

Moreover, given the urgency and the need for intervention, participants urged NGOs to provide logistic, technical and financial support, collect and disseminate data and information on the fight against poaching (LAB), and help in awareness raising and other activities in close conjunction with the LAB.

 

 The meeting of Ministers of ECCAS member countries present culminated with a statement mainly calling on Ivory consuming countries on the one hand to take drastic measures to deter consumers and on the other hand, urging the poachers’ countries of origin to support affected countries in combating poaching. In addition, the ECCAS countries extended an invitation to the President of the Republic of Cameroon, His Excellency Paul Biya, to agree to be the highest authority in the sub-region, the spokesperson of the anti-poaching fight in Central Africa. In addition, ECCAS countries will mobilize up to 1,000 soldiers to initiate joint military operations to save the last surviving savannah elephants. The emergency plan with an estimated cost of 1.8 million Euros, will require air support, field vehicles, satellite phones, the establishment of a joint military command with a system of sharing and real-time analysis of information, and envisages sending a diplomatic mission to Sudan and South Sudan - the poachers’ country of origin.

 

 It is with words of gratitude to the Cameroon Government for the warm welcome, the facilities made available to them for the smooth conduct of this meeting that various delegations parted with the hope of finally seeing the elephants of the ECCAS zone safe in the coming days.

 

Kindly download

 

 

(1) Declaration on the fight against poaching (LAB)

 

(2) Experts’ Segment Report

 

(3) WWF Press release: Central Africa will mobilise up to 1000 soldiers to save these elephants - Please contact M. Bas HUIJBREGTS, WWF Central Africa - bhuijbregts@wwfcarpo.org

 

 (4) Declaration on the fight against poaching pronounced by IUCN-MIKE at the end of the ECCAS meeting– Please contact: Ms. WANDJA Chantal « Chantal.Wandja@iucn.org » Back

 

Go back

CBFP News

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) update - iucncongress2020

In light of recent developments in France linked to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), IUCN and the Government of France are in close discussion about the impacts on the IUCN World Conservation Congress 2020. Together, we are carefully considering any decisions that might need to be taken.​​​​

Read more …

New dates and venue for critical UN Biodiversity Convention meetings, dates for UN Biodiversity Conference 2020 to be adjusted – CBD

The twenty-fourth meeting of the Subsidiary Body on Scientific, Technical and Technological Advice (SBSTTA-24) will now be held 25 to 30 August 2020; and the third meeting of the Subsidiary Body on Implementation (SBI-3) will take place 1 to 6 September 2020. Both meetings will be held in Ottawa, Canada.

Read more …

China’s Belt and Road Initiative could pose increased risk to endangered wildlife, EIA warns UK MPs - EIA

The global spread of China’s controversial Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) brings with it increased risks of endangered wildlife consumption and illegal wildlife trade, UK politicians were warned. At an event organised by the All-Party Parliamentary China Group in Parliament yesterday (11 March), EIA Wildlife Campaigner and China Specialist Aron White cautioned that the international proliferation of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) – touted as a pillar of the BRI – poses potential risks for biodiversity around the world.

Read more …

Differentiated evolution of the tropical timber trade in 2019 – COMMODAFRICA – ATIBT

The 16 March 2020 article on the COMMODAFRICA website shows that log imports into China have decreased and that sawn timber imports into the European Union are increasing for the second consecutive year.

Read more …

Atibt- Timber sector in the DRC: Study on the state of play of the stakeholders

As part of the implementation of the FLEGT-REDD CERTIFICATION projects set up by the ATIBT and financed by the European Union, the FFEM and the KfW, the Federation of Timber Industrialists, in abbreviation FIB, conducted a study on the state of play of the actors of the forest and wood sector in the DRC.

Read more …

Theguardian-UK to lead global fight against illegal logging and deforestation

Plan to form coalition of developing countries at COP 26 to help support efforts. The UK is to spearhead a major global crackdown on illegal timber and deforestation, with plans to form a coalition of developing countries against the trade as part of its hosting of crunch UN climate talks this year.

Read more …

Induforgroup-Forest Law Amendment to Transform China’s Forest Sector

China’s forest landscapes, forest-dependent communities, and industry face massive transformation following key legislative and institutional changes over the past several years. China’s newly revised Forest Law (cn/en) will introduce greater change when it comes into force in July 2020. Shifting away from a focus on timber production, the revised law seeks to balance forest management to more fully realize the role of forests in providing economic, social, ecological and cultural services.

Read more …

Theguardian-Plan to drain Congo peat bog for oil could release vast amount of carbon

Drilling in one of the greatest carbon sinks on the planet could release greenhouse gases equivalent to Japan’s annual emissions, experts warn. The world’s largest tropical peatlands could be destroyed if plans go ahead to drill for oil under the Congo basin, according to an investigation that suggests draining the area would release the same amount of carbon dioxide as Japan emits annually.

Read more …

CBFP News Archive

2020