Congo Basin is mobilizing in Brussels at the European Development Days

Copyright: ©European Union

 

 

eudevdays.eu:  Public Private Partnership in conservation as intervention for peace

 

Are PPPs in conservation an effective intervention when it comes to peace-building? Or should we leave this to UN peace keeping units?

 

Key points

  • Conservation of biodiversity central to development and increased prosperity in Africa.
     
  • Linkages between security and conservation are set to become more and more important in central and west Africa.
     
  •  Negotiating conservation accords can bring warring factions together where talks about security would be impossible.
     
  • Conservation programme in areas of political instability, weak government and violence must benefit and involve local people.
     
  • Public-private conservation partnerships in Africa must avoid being seen as neo-colonialist organisations, particularly where protected national parks were established before independence. 

 

 

 

Synopsis

In areas of central and west Africa where weak governance and recurrent violence have contributed to massive losses of wildlife and natural habitats, public-private partnerships (PPPs) to protect and manage beleaguered national parks have attracted international funding from the European Union and United States among others, plus support from UNESCO and park management roles for wildlife charities such as the World Wide Fund for Nature.

 

 

Advocates of these PPPs say the benefits include greater financial and technical resources for conservation than could possibly be provided locally, well as employment opportunities for local communities and a wider tax base for the state. Where local populations see direct economic benefits from the parks, and cooperate closely with park rangers, PPPs can also improve security.

 

 

In parks neighbouring Sudan, for example, local people have provided early warnings of armed groups approaching the border, allowing security forces to prepare. Negotiating conservation accords can also provide a forum where warring factions are willing to talk despite their ongoing and deep-seated rivalries.

 

 

The long-term viability of conservation PPPs depends in part on their perceived legitimacy among government officials and the local communities, particularly where national parks were colonial creations. One way to avoid suspicion of neo-colonialist interference by outsiders is to employ Africans in key conservation roles, rather than expatriates. Good communications from the outset is essential to assure national partners that their private sector and NGO colleagues don’t have hidden agendas.

 

 

Equally, in regions where human rights abuses are frequent and widespread, conservation partnerships cannot ignore the underlying causes of the violence that led to the degradation of national parks in the first place. These may well include armed conflicts rooted in competition for access to natural resources, especially water and land.

 

 

The political complexities of running a conservation PPP in unstable political areas were recently illustrated by an incident in the Chinko National Park in the Central African Republic, when Muslim families took refuge from Christian marauders seeking to kill them. The park manager was accused of taking sides in the conflict, requiring the operational manager of the African Parks Network, the PPP which runs Chinko, to act as a go-between.

 

 

Separately, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) has been accused of supporting anti-poaching eco-rangers involved with human rights abuses of the hunter-gatherer Baka people of Cameroon’s rainforest. The complaint brought against WWF by Survivors International is being mediated by a Swiss government official under guidelines from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. 

 

Find out more....

 

Go back

CBFP News

Republic of Congo Forest Governance Forum – Concept Note

This concept note outlines the aims and objectives, and indicative themes for the Republic of Congo regional Forest Governance Forum (FGF), which will be held on the 30th - 31st October 2018 in Brazzaville.  

Read more …

2018 CAFI Forum: focus on Land-use planning

The search for a solution: Can land use planning be a catalyst for sustainable and forest-friendly economic development in Central African countries? Oslo, Norway: On Friday June 29, the Central African Forest Initiative will host a high-level forum on Land use planning (LUP) as an essential tool for integrated, inclusive and sustainable development.

Read more …

Fern: Forest Watch Special, FLEGT-VPA Update June 2018

One year ago, forests and their crucial ecological and economic role were again at the forefront of the EU’s policy agenda. In June 2017, at the EU conference on illegal logging and deforestation, EU Commissioner for International Development Neven Mimica said: “Evidence shows that FLEGT remains an innovative, comprehensive and future-proof initiative, with the power to inspire a global movement to eradicate illegal logging. A long-term commitment is needed to tackle the complex issues that enable illegal logging to still persist, and to achieve sustainable forest management in line with Sustainable Development Goal 15.”

 

Read more …

CIFOR FORESTS NEWS: What if Cameroonian consumers wanted legal timber?

Cameroon - Cameroonians are still not very interested in knowing the origin of the wood they buy, but a growing number of consumers are looking for legal and sustainable products. This is the main conclusion of a recent study I conducted with other scientists from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) and partners, which explores the domestic timber market in Cameroon.

Read more …

Welcome to our new partner Ghent University, Department of Green Chemistry and Technology and Department of Environment!

Belgium 16 April 2018. Ghent University, Department of Green Chemistry and Technology and Department of Environment officially joined the members of the Congo Basin Forests Partnership (CBFP). As part of the accession process, Ghent University submitted the required documents and agreed to abide by the CBFP members’ cooperation framework in promoting sustainable management of forest ecosystems in Central Africa.

Read more …

Fern: the CBFP’s new partner Welcome to our new member!

Brussels, 08 May 2018: Fern has officially joined the Congo Basin Forest Partnership (CBFP). As part of the application process, Fern has submitted the required documents and agreed to abide by the CBFP members’ cooperation framework in promoting sustainable management of forest ecosystems in Central Africa.

Read more …

CBFP Council Meeting draws delegates to Brazzaville (Congo), 1 June 2018

The roadmap of the Kingdom of Belgium Facilitation of the Congo Basin Forest Partnership (CBFP) adopted, CBFP results-oriented governance underway with report submitted by CBFP college leaders, 4th CBFP Council meeting consolidates gains, enhances credibility of the governance reform and active preparations underway for the 18th Meeting of CBFP  Parties due to take place in Brussels from 27 to 28 November 2018.

Read more …

Volume 10 of the Congo Basin’s Scientific and Technical Forest and Environment Review

It is a bi-annual publication (April and October), edited and published by RIFFEAC (Central African Network of Forestry and Environmental Training Institutions).

Read more …

CBFP News Archive

2018

Fourth CBFP Council meeting
Forest Watch - April 2018