Unenvironment-From heatwaves to rising seas: How trees defend us

 

 

It is common knowledge that planting trees tackles the causes of climate change by absorbing carbon emissions. Less known is the fact that forests also treat the symptoms of climate change, whether they are heatwaves, drought or crumbling coastal towns.

 

 

Here’s how. The outsize potential of trees to halt the climate crisis has generated a lot of media buzz recently, and rightly so – trees have an enormous capacity to absorb carbon emissions. Yet something crucial is missing from these stories. Forests don’t just absorb carbon; they also defend us from its most devastating impacts.

 

 

Heatwaves have been scorching India and Europe this summer, killing dozens of people. This July was the hottest month ever recorded, while the previous month was the hottest June on record. But as our air-conditioning systems whirr incessantly, providing much-needed respite from the stifling heat, they guzzle masses of fossil fuels, which in turn heats the planet. Our houses may stay cool, but the planet doesn’t.

 

 

There’s a growing recognition that one of the best technologies for tackling overheating cities was invented long before humans appeared: trees. Bringing parks, green spaces and canopies into cities has a cooling benefit during hot days; plants absorb water and then release it through evaporation, in the same way sweating keeps us cool.

 

 

On a sunny day, from evaporation alone, a single healthy tree can have the cooling power of more than 10 air-conditioning units. That’s not including the shade they provide for buildings, which in the United States can reduce air-conditioning costs of detached houses by 20 per cent to 30 per cent. And instead of emitting more carbon, trees absorb it. Not to mention, trees have the ability to filter air pollution, improving our health and that of the planet.

 

The city of Melbourne, Australia, is aiming to almost double canopy cover – from 22 per cent to 40 per cent – by 2040 to tackle heatwaves. Around 3,000 new trees will be planted each year.

 

 

This way of using nature to adapt to climate change, known as “ecosystem-based adaptation” or “nature-based solutions”, is, quite literally, a breath of fresh air.

 

 

It’s part of a much larger paradigm of environmental problem-solving called nature-based solutions. The United Nations Secretary-General’s Climate Action Summit this month will provide an opportune moment to catapult nature-based solutions to the forefront of climate action.

 

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Adaptation Fund at COP25

The 25th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP25), as well as CMP15 and CMA2 will be held from December 2-13, 2019 in Madrid, Spain. The conference was originally scheduled to take place in Santiago, Chile, but the venue was changed due to the difficult situation the country was undergoing. However, Chile remains as the COP25 Presidency with Spain stepping forward to host this conference of “action”, demonstrating the spirit of cooperation and partnership in the fight against climate change.

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Rwanda and Republic of Congo receive project funding approved during Adaptation Fund Board meeting - Adaptation Fund Board Approves US$ 63 Million in New Projects, Including First Innovation and Scale-Up Grants

The new grant window projects approved by the Board include small innovation grants for Armenia (through its NIE, EPIU) and Chile (through its NIE, AGCID), and one project scale-up grant for Rwanda through its NIE, the Ministry of Environment…Through its concrete project funding process, the Board approved six concrete adaptation projects totaling over US$ 52 million in Congo, El Salvador, Georgia, Malawi, the Republic of Moldova, and a regional project in Djibouti, Kenya, Sudan and Uganda

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No mobilization for Central Africa during the 24th GCF Board meeting which allocates USD 407.8 million, raising GCF's total portfolio to USD 5.6 billion. The Board 24th approved 13 new projects. Similarly, for Central Africa no projects were approved under the Simplified Approval Process (SAP) as well as accreditation during the 24th GCF Board meeting…

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CBFP News Archive

2019

Adaptation Fund at COP25
BCC 2020 Save the Date!
Forest Watch October 2019
World Bamboo Day
China goes green again!
GEF Newsletter | June 2019
The Cafi Dialogues
Forest Watch April 2019
Forest Watch March 2019