dronebelow: With Drones, BioCarbon Engineering Shows Money Actually Can Grow on Trees

 

 

Climate change is a sprawling, complex problem. However we all know one very simple way to have a positive impact on climate change: plant more trees. Trees scrub pollution from the air, reduce erosion, improve water quality, provide homes for animals and insects, and enhance our lives in countless other ways.

 

 

In a new report by World Resources Institute (WRI) and The Nature Conservancy (TNC), it appears many businesses around the world are making money by planting trees. The new report, ‘The Business of Planting Trees: A Growing Investment Opportunity’, shows that restoring degraded and deforested lands is not only a boon for the environment, but a lucrative opportunity for investors and entrepreneurs. “The long-term growth outlook is positive as technology lowers the costs of tree-planting, consumers reward companies who restore forests, governments make large commitments to rehabilitate their land, and business model innovation continues,” said Sofia Faruqi, Manager at WRI and report co-author. “The confluence of these factors signals that now’s the time to invest in restoration.” The report identifies four emerging themes in the restoration economy: technology, consumer products, project management and commercial forestry.

 

 

As countries push to regrow forests, startups are dreaming up new, faster ways to plant trees. For some innovators, like NASA veteran Dr. Lauren Fletcher, that means using drones. To tackle the problem of deforestation he created the company BioCarbon Engineering. Working with colleagues, he came up with a 30-pound unmanned aerial vehicle nicknamed “Robin.” It can fly over the most rugged landscapes on earth, planting trees in precise locations at the rate of 120 per minute. Step one was finding the right species of tree. Step two was building tree-planting robots.

 

 

BioCarbon Engineering now has a fleet of drones whose goal is to plant 500 billion trees by 2050. Flying ten feet off the ground, the drones gently fire seed pods into the earth at the rate of two per second. A fixed wing drone maps the area to be planted, optimising the planting pattern to avoid obstructions. One drone can carrying 300 seedpods can cover 1 hectare in 18 minutes. It’s a system that buoys the hope of our planet’s climate predicament.

 

 

Read more...

Go back

CBFP News

Adaptation Fund at Adaptation Futures 2018

As a partner, the Adaptation Fund will have an active presence at the premier international conference on climate change adaptation at the Adaptation Futures held June 18-21, 2018 in Cape Town, South Africa – the country which is also home to two innovative Adaptation Fund projects.

Read more …

GCF: Adaptation planning vital in helping countries weather change

Songdo, 27 Apr 2018 A guide to NAPs and why GCF is supporting this UN process to spark catalytic climate action

Read more …

ic.fsc: LOCAL MARKETS, GLOBAL SUCCESS, How FSC makes an economic impact across the world

FSC is a global not-for-profit organization that helps take care of the environment and boost the global economy by ensuring responsible management of close to 190 million hectares of the world’s forests.

Read more …

Revaluing Tropical Diversity

Why clear vast swathes of rainforest, with up to 75,000 tree species per kilometre, and replace it with a single species of oil palm? Why are custodians of a vast amount of cultural knowledge forced to live in poverty on the sidelines of society? The short answer is because there is a huge difference between the intrinsic value of the diversity of the tropics and its current economic value. Business destroys diversity when it does not value it. Government alone cannot hold stop the loss – we need to fight fire with fire as it were, and create innovative business models that change the incentives for tropical decision-makers. We need to create incomes from sustaining, and not destroying, tropical diversity.

Read more …

1843magazine: Bend it like bamboo Strong, bendy and abundant, bamboo is springing up in unexpected areas of design, architecture and technology

Ubiquitous in Asia in objects from chopsticks and bowls to scaffolding and screening, bamboo has often been disregarded as a material for large-scale architecture. But Vo Trong Nghia, who grew up in a forest village in northern Vietnam and knew how strong, light and tactile it could be, saw no sense in that. After training as an architect and founding his own firm, he began working with bamboo, figuring out how to bend and form it with heat, then lash lengths of it together into columns and pillars using rattan and bamboo nails. The result has been a series of cathedral-like structures like the Café Indochine (above) in Kontum in central Vietnam, which consists of a flat roof supported by prefabricated fans of dark bamboo whose curves create elegant, arched avenues.

Read more …

Ramsar: The Ramsar Convention enters into force for the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

In January, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea deposited its instrument of accession to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, as amended in 1982 and 1987, with the Office of International Standards and Legal Affairs of UNESCO, the Depositary of the Convention. Effective 16 May 2018, the Convention enters into force for Ramsar’s 170th Contracting Party.

Read more …

GEF: Nations rally to protect global environment

April 25, 2018 Countries pledge US$4.1 billion to the Global Environment Facility. Close to 30 countries have jointly pledged US$4.1 billion to the Global Environment Facility (GEF) to better protect the future of the planet and human well-being. With the health of the global environment worsening, the GEF has received strong support for its new four-year investment cycle, (known as GEF-7), to help safeguard the world’s forests, land, water, climate, and oceans, build green cities, protect threatened wildlife, and tackle new environmental threats like marine plastic pollution.

Read more …

GEF: In Rwanda, a sweet alternative to deforestation

The son of a beekeeper, Emmanuel Kajugujugu grew up learning how to harvest honey in the village of Rega, nestled in the hillside around the Gishwati forest in Rwanda’s northwest.

Read more …

CBFP News Archive

2018

Forest Watch - April 2018