boell.de-Great expectations, low execution: The Katowice climate change conference COP 24

 

 

Assessement. The Katowice climate package brings minor progress, but COP 24 failed to deliver on the most fundamental issues such as raising ambition of national contributions, implementing human rights, and ensuring support for developing countries.

 

 

The Katowice Climate Package, a compilation of Paris Rulebook documents – without rules for carbon trading – was adopted at COP 24 along with other decisions and action points that bring minor progress in specific areas such as finance, gender, and indigenous peoples. But overall, COP 24 failed to deliver on the most fundamental issues such as raising ambition of national contributions, implementing human rights in the Paris Rulebook, and ensuring fair and reliable support for developing countries to assist them in their efforts to combat global warming and its effects.

This detailed analysis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

High expectations for high ambitions

The Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, released 8 October by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the UN body that assesses the science related to climate change, sounded a last minute alarm to save the world.

 

 

Its key messages are unwavering: limiting temperature increase to 1.5°C is feasible only if carbon emissions are reduced by half by 2030 – only 11 years from now – and reach “net zero” by 2050. Such radical emissions cuts will require massive transformations in the global energy and transport systems, and the protection and restoration of natural ecosystems.

 

 

So optimism was high for increased ambition – on emissions reductions by all countries and scaled-up finance for developing countries to implement those reductions – among the more than 22,000 participants at the 24th Conference of the Parties (COP 24) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Katowice, a city in Poland’s coal-producing heartland, which began on 2 December, nearly three years after the adoption of the Paris Agreement.

 

 

An early – and dramatic – push-back on climate ambition

What should have been the routine adoption of a document under a subsidiary body (SBSTA – the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technical Advice), which compiled scientific studies published in 2018 – including the IPCC Special Report – transformed into high drama during a mid-session plenary on 8 December. The document merely “noted” the IPCC report but the Maldives, speaking for the 44 members of the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS) – among the countries most vulnerable to climate change – proposed to “welcome” the report. They were supported by nearly every nation in the world.

 

 

But not the United States. “As the United States stated at the IPCC plenary on October 6, acceptance of the report and approval of the Summary for Policy Makers by the IPCC does not imply endorsement of the specific findings or the underlying contents by the United States.” Kuwait, the Russian Federation, and Saudi Arabia rapidly stood behind the US. Saudi Arabia and a few of its oil-exporting partners had also fought to water down the IPCC report’s conclusions at its session in October, even trying to eliminate all mentions of the Paris Agreement.

 

 

The plenary was abruptly suspended and, after more than an hour, compromise language to “welcome the effort of the IPCC experts” was roundly rejected. Under UN rules, with no consensus, the document was scrapped.

 

 

The COP final decision agreed one week later found compromise language which “Welcomes the timely completion” of the report and “Invites Parties to make use” of its information. But that stand-off set the tone for the remainder of the talks.

 

Read more...

Go back

CBFP News

ITTO- More collaboration and participation needed to achieve the SFM in the Congo Basin

The Tokyo International Conference on development in Africa (TICAD) is an international meeting hosted by the Japanese government and jointly sponsored by the United Nations, the United Nations Development Program, the African Union Commission and the World Bank. Taking the floor during the opening of this ITTO event, Ms. Matondo pointed out that international partners can help the Congo Basin population to overcome various hurdles impeding the sub-region’s achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals 1 (zero poverty) 13 (Measures to combat climate change) and 15 (land life) using innovative technology, know-how, entrepreneurship and capacity building.

Read more …

COMIFAC- Shanghai international forum: COMIFAC goes on charm offensive

Shanghai, Republic of China, 21-25 October 2019- More than three hundred and fifty delegates including about sixty members of the International Technical Tropical Timber Association (ITTTA), sixty conference speakers and panelists took part in the 21st ITTTA forum. COMIFAC was represented at the gathering by Mr. Georges Moucharou, 2nd Technical Adviser at the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife and representative of the Acting President, Raymond Ndomba Ngoye, Executive Secretary and Mr. Valery Tchuante, a monitoring and evaluation expert.

Read more …

COMIFAC member countries make progress and develop innovations in implementing Nagoya Protocol

30 September to 1st October 2019, Douala Cameroon-: Sub-regional experience-sharing forum on ABS held between COMIFAC researchers and the Japanese private sector.

Read more …

African biodiversity highly valued at sub-regional experience-sharing forum on ABS between COMIFAC researchers and the Japanese private sector.

Douala, Cameroon, 30 September- 1st October 2019 “The sub-regional Convergence Plan projects a 25% increase in absolute terms in the forestry-environment sector’s contribution to the GDP of the COMIFAC countries by 2025” said Mr. Ludovic ITSOUA MADZOUS, Deputy Executive Secretary of COMIFAC, as he welcomed the holding of the first meeting between a developed country and researchers of the Central African countries.

Read more …

Preparatory workshop of the 18 December Civil Society Day within the framework of the Congo Basin Forest Partnership (CBFP).

Saturday, 2 November 2019, End and closing of the preparatory workshop of the 18 December Civil Society Day held within the framework of the Congo Basin Forest Partnership (CBFP).

 

Read more …

Huge turnout of CBFP members in Shanghai, China: Minister of State and CBFP Facilitator François-Xavier de Donnea strengthens dialogue between Congo Basin and key Chinese actors of the Forestry-timber sector

From 15 to 21 November 2019 in Shanghai, China), Minister of State and CBFP Facilitator, Francois-Xavier de Donnea, took part in the International Forum on Green Supply Chains for forest products industry, entitled : “Together towards Global Green Supply Chains - A Forest Products Industry Initiative”

Read more …

Sub-regional guidelines for tracking the contribution of forests to sustainable development goals in Central African countries

The deadline for submitting comments is 31 October (to allow time to include them in the version to be submitted to the participants of the validation workshop slated for 26 and 27 November in Libreville) Contacts: Valerie Tchuante (tvtchuante@comifac.org ) and Jean Claude Nguinguiri (JeanClaude.Nguinguiri@fao.org).

Read more …

forestsnews.cifor-Despite size, Congo Basin attracts less funding than other major forest areas

The study shows that Central African forests received $2 billion from bilateral (52.5 percent) and multilateral (47.5 percent) sources, with Germany accounting for 25 percent of funding, followed by the European Union and the Global Environment Fund (GEF). Most funds went to Democratic Republic of Congo (40 percent), Chad (17 percent) and Cameroon (14 percent).

Read more …

CBFP News Archive

2019

BCC 2020 Save the Date!
Forest Watch October 2019
World Bamboo Day
China goes green again!
GEF Newsletter | June 2019
The Cafi Dialogues
Forest Watch April 2019
Forest Watch March 2019